Golden Parachute – for Loosers

WOW ! Listing here only a few of them: Exxon Mobil Corp. former Chief Executive Officer Lee Raymond tops the list with a $351 million payout.  Stan O’Neal, former CEO of Merryl Lynch – 161 million for his retirement/ousting, (after reporting a $2.24 billion loss and the biggest quarterly loss in the company’s 93-year history).  Stephen Elop, former CEO of Nokia – 25 million as a Good-Bye present. Mike Nafirovski, Nortel – 3.4 million (after having requested 12 million), in 2009, when stepping down from a bankrupt company.  Hank McKinnell of Pfizer – a whooping 213 million in 2006 after the company’s stock decline by 40%. Carly Fiorina of Hewlett Packard – 42 million after being forced out.
[NOTE. the above payouts in dollars slightly below or above, depending on the market sources.].
What do they all have in common ? They fucked up big corporations in their capacity as CEO or otherwise at the helm of those companies.
In contrast, compare that with any of the companies within the oil and pipeline industry in their relationships towards professional employees:
Following a takeover within that industry (which happened and still probably does happen frequently), a ‘Kick in the butt to hard-working professionals’ – ZERO cents. Message often was: “Walk out and go home”, especially to vulnerable groups of employees such as women or single mothers. Example: the likes of Trans Canada (TCPL, early 1980’s), and many more of that genre.

Victoria BC Vancouver Island

has one of the most beautiful Parks – Beacon Hill Park – just across from the Ocean – Juan de Fuca Strait, the southern end of Vancouver Island, looking across to Washington State, USA. We have many special birds and foul in the park – particularly colorful peacocks. Today was another sunny day, I walked through the Park taking some video’s of our birds and the Ocean.

Canada Operation Impact – IS

CANADA AIR STRIKES – Northern Iraq

Operation Impact – Canada’s contribution to air strikes against IS targets in Northern Iraq [ http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/operations-abroad-current/op-impact.page ], using CF-188 Hornet fighter jets conducting 62 sorties in Northern Iraq. This morning’s interview with the Minister of Defence on CFAX Radio 1070, explaining those recent missions. Latest air strikes following the Remembrance Day ceremonies across Canada – recounting all those heroic deeds of long past wars (heroic as in attacking entire populations from the air). As the past has shown, air missions inevitably target not only specific often small areas, but surrounding areas, which has resulted and will result again in killing large numbers of civilian populations, and children. Only cowards attack from the air. The so called coalition forces (most of whom are sceptical about these newest US/Canada air attacks on their soil) have their “boots on the ground”, fighting. [ http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/u-s-led-airstrikes-against-isis-kill-at-least-860-activists-say-1.2832092 ].

Citizenship Injustice

Loosing one’s citizenship of birth is a big deal, especially if the new country of citizenship has not been acquired in the course of regular or desired immigration, but merely due to circumstance and under duress.
Canadian citizenship usually is easy to acquire, provided there is proof of employment (at least this was the case forty years ago when we arrived) or maybe a sponsor – some sort of relative who lives here already. Dual citizenship used to be more difficult. Many larger European countries removed birth citizenship from any of their citizens once they assumed Canadian. Of course, Canada does not care much about dual, but it is the country of birth that controls it – either keep it or loose it.
In between there were multiple citizenship and immigration reforms, one of them allowing dual citizenship under the following circumstances: At the time when applying for the Canadian one must prove that there is still a bind with the home country, family or property or other. In my case, my entire family never left their country, they are all in Europe, only myself and at that time my little son were in Canada.
Unfortunately, all this happening before the European Union (EU) came into being.
Also in between and many years ago my son – who has dual citizenship because he was born in a smaller European country – returned to his home country for good.  Meanwhile I am still in Canada, still only Canadian citizenship, and when travelling to my home country am forced to go to the Foreigners’ Office to buy myself an extension for stay, else stay is limited to three months.
To argue: why do those who do not care about Canadian citizenship – because they neither live here anymore nor are interested in Canadian affairs – still keep and retain dual citizenship including Canadian, while at the same time those who decided to immigrate to Canada retain theirs, although they never even visit their home country anymore.
We should allow dual citizenship for those Canadians who are longtime taxpayers in this country and receive pensions in this country, but have all of their family residing in Europe. This not also because of complicated taxation issues arising out of income in both countries, but mainly to make a long term visit to their families, instead of only a measly three months.